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Learning Wine

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Brad W

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Re: Learning Wine

by Brad W » Tue May 27, 2008 12:52 pm

PaigeM wrote:Though I much prefer drinking wine to reading about it, I've found one written guide that's a great complement to everything Robin produces. It's called "Oldman's Guide to Outsmarting Wine : 108 Ingenious Shortcuts to Navigate the World of Wine with Confidence and Style"

http://www.amazon.com/Oldmans-Guide-Out ... 286&sr=1-1

But really, the best method is to have an open mind and try everything! For years, I said "I just don't like white wine" -- I guess because I consumed too many crappy Chardonnays -- but the inclusion of Sauvignon Blanc on some Sonoma tasting flights changed my mind fast. And remember, your tastes will change over time. That's what's so great about learning wine: a producer's wine, and your reaction to it, will change by year and even by day. Have fun!



I've fallen prey to the same issue...I felt the same way about whites FOR YEARS... but lately I've slowly come to appreciate Sauv Blanc and now Pinot Grigio's...
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Mark Head

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Re: Learning Wine

by Mark Head » Tue May 27, 2008 1:13 pm

To change things up we've been drinking quite a bit of sauv blanc from New Zealand that is just outstanding. Also we enjoy some of the non-oaked chards, pinot blanc, dry rieslings from Europe. The world of wine has something for everyone.

Most of all...have fun!
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Leann C

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Re: Learning Wine

by Leann C » Tue May 27, 2008 5:18 pm

The email below was forwarded to me by a friend. I am not affiated, just passing along the info for anyone who might be interested....

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Free Wine Tasting THURSDAY MAY 29th

Dear Friends

This week we are hosting a Free Wine tasting Thursday May 29th 4:00 pm -8:00 pm. We will be featuring three fantastic wines from Mendocino County, CA. Living in Kentucky (HorseCountry), you are probably familiar with the Seabiscuit Story. Seabiscuit was a phenomenal race horse, noted for his competitive spirit. After his racing days Seabiscuit was retired to a ranch in California. These wines are produced under the Seabiscuit Ranch label, all produced with notable Mendocino Fruit. We will be tasting a Merlot, Chardonnay, and a blend of three grapes called Trifecta. Just like the charm of the famous race horse... we are willing to bet that you will be mesmerized by these awesome wines.

Benjamin Smith
Theater Square Wine & Spirits
651 South 4th Street
Louisville, Ky 40202
(502)625-3001
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Brett Davis

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Re: Learning Wine

by Brett Davis » Wed May 28, 2008 6:03 pm

I believe there are many paths to learn about wine. Regardless, all of them require a fair share of drinking and reading. Those just happen to be two of my favorite past times. :wink:

There are classes such as the one Scott Harper teaches. There are enthusiast groups such as chapters of the American Wine Society and American Institute of Wine and Food. There are Wine Course books and some intensive Wine Schools in New York and California. Any of these are fine choices.

Personally, I prefer to take the approach of getting together with five or six other people willing to commit to meeting every week, two weeks, or month (depending on how intense the group wants it) and go on world wine tour together. Take one major wine producing country at a time, break it down into it's primary wine producing regions, and commence to drinking examples of the region's more important wine types and learning about them as a group. Each person takes their turn hosting and playing instructor for their assigned region. It is usually best for the host to cover the cost of their tasting unless it is a regions such as Burgundy, Bordeaux, or Piedmont. After a year or two or three, the group will find they have gone around the world together. Another great thing about the group setting is tasting with five or six different palates. This is how you learn that the perception of wine quality is as subjective as art. I've been part of two long lived versions of these groups and cannot express how much I learned.

Or...you can just buy a good all-encompassing book and do it on your own one wine at a time.
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